THE EUROPEAN ANCESTRY
JOHANNES YEAGER/JOHN HUNTER
SETTLED IN WASHINGTON COUNTY TENNESSEE IN 1783
 
 The Swiss church records in the following article are found 
in the Reformed Church records (One of the state church of 
Switzerland) in the various towns and villages of Canton Basel-Land 
Switzerland.  Where the location and date of a marriage is 
not included, that church record has not been located, however 
the marriage is confirmed by baptismal records in the town or 
village where noted.  The village of Arisdorf is about five miles 
ESE from the city of Basel, Switzerland.  Wenslingen is about 
five miles SE from Arisdorf.
 
 Anna B\'fcss, daughter of Zachariah and Maria (Schaffner) B\'fcss 
was Baptized at Wenslingen, Basel-Land Switzerland March 21, 
1682.  
Hans [Johannes] Imbert W\'fcrtz married Anna Waltisberger at 
Wenslingen, Basel-Land Switzerland July 2, 1667.  Their son, Hans 
[Johannes] W\'fcrtz, was baptized at Wenslingen August 6, 1671.
 
Hans [Johannes] W\'fcrtz, son of Hans Imbert and Anna 
(Waltisberger) W\'fcrtz, married Anna B\'fcss, daughter of Zachariah 
and Maria (Schaffner) B\'fcss at Wenslingen January 30, 1700.
 
 Ursula W\'fcrtz, daughter of Hans [Johannes] and Anna (B\'fcss) 
W\'fcrtz was baptized at Wenslingen June 21, 1716.
 
 Magdalena "Madla" Hodel, daughter of Hans [Johannes] and Ann 
(Martin) Hodel was baptized at Arisdorf, Basel-Land, Switzerland 
November 20, 1641 and married at Arisdorf January 29, 1675, 
Johannes Jaeger, pronounced Yeager.  
 
 Heini [Heinrich] Jaeger, son of Johannes and Magdalena 
(Hodel) Jaeger was baptized at Arisdforf, Basel-Land Switzerland 
October 7, 1679.  Heini Jaeger, son of Johannes and Magdalena 
(Hodel) Jaeger, married Maria Heinimann of the village of Bennwil, 
Basel-Land, but the place and date of the marriage have not been 
determined.  We know only that she was aged forty when the family 
was granted permission to immigrate from Switzerland on March 5, 
1740..
 
 Heini [Heinrich] Jaeger, son of Heini and Maria (Heinimann) 
Jaeger was baptized at Arisdorf, Basel-Land Switzerland July 6, 
1715.
 
 Heini [Heinrich] Jaeger, son of Heini and Maria (Heinimann) 
Jaeger, married Ursula W\'fcrtz, daughter of Hans and Anna (B\'fcss) 
W\'fcrtz.
 
 Johannes Jaeger, son of Heinrich [Henry] and Ursula (W\'fcrtz) 
Jaeger was baptized at Arisdorf, Basel-Land Switzerland May 14, 
1737.  Johannes Jaeger, who later adopted the English translation 
of his Germanic name and became John Hunter, married Barbara 
Bowman, daughter of Jacob and Varena (____) Bowman and eventually 
settled on Cherokee Creek in Washington County Tennessee.
 
 At a public auction, the only legal means of disposing of 
property in Switzerland at that time, Heine and Maria (heinimann) 
Jaeger sold their property for \'a31470 and then after paying in 
taxes, \'a3202, Heini Jaeger Sr., then aged 60 years, and his wife, 
Maria (Heinemann) Jaeger, then aged 40 years, with their family, 
were granted permission to emigrate from Basel on March 5, 1740.  
After traveling by ship down the Rhine river, through Germany and 
Holland, they sailed from Rotterdam, Holland on the ship 
FRIENDSHIP, arriving at Philadelphia, Pennsylvania September 23, 
1740.
 
 The family, for whom taxes were paid, consisted of the 
parents, Heini and Maria (Heinemann) Jaeger, their son, Heinrich 
Jaeger, baptized at Arisdorf July 6, 1715 and his wife, Ursula 
(W\'fcrtz) Jaeger, baptized at Wenslingen June 21, 1716, with their 
two children, Johannes, baptized at Arisdorf May 14, 1737 and 
Heini, baptized at Arisdorf October 20, 1739.  And daughter Anna 
Jaeger, baptized at Arisdorf November 9, 1721.  
 
 Those immigrants who arrived in 1740 suffered through severe 
storms, probably hurricanes, while crossing the Atlantic.  These 
storms delayed their arrival and Ursula (W\'fcrtz) Jaeger was among 
the approximately forty people from Basel-Land who died on board 
ship, principally from starvation, while enroute to America.
 
 Heini Jaeger Jr. married (2) at Heidelberg Township, 
Lancaster County Pennsylvania, now York County, about 1742, Anna 
Maria Sch\'e4ublin, daughter of Christian and Barbara (Spitteler) 
Sch\'e4ublin.  Anna Maria was baptized at Oberdorf, Basel-Land 
Switzerland October 6, 1723.   Heinrich [Henry] and Anna Maria 
(Sch\'e4ublin) Jaeger had two children, Anna Barbara Jaeger and 
Heinrich Jaeger (baptized by Rev. Jacob Lischy at Heidelberg 
Township, York County Pennsylvania March 18, 1745), 
 
 The son, Heinrich Jaeger, baptized at Arisdorf October 20, 
1739 apparently died shortly after arriving in Pennsylvania, but 
from family tradition he did survive the Atlantic crossing.
 
 Christian Sch\'e4ublin, who was a blacksmith, and his family 
emigrated from Oberdorf, Basel-Land Switzerland in 1736.  He 
arrived in Philadelphia on the ship PRINCESS AUGUSTA September 
16, 1736.  He had been in considerable trouble in Switzerland 
because of his religious beliefs and his association with those 
of pacifist religious persuasions.
 
 On February 16, 1742, Henry Yeager Jr. was issued a warrant 
by the Proprietary of the Colony of Pennsylvania, Richard Penn, 
son of William Penn, for a tract of land containing 100 acres in 
Heidelberg Township, Lancaster County Pennsylvania.  This land 
fell in York County when York County was created in 1749.  When 
surveyed (Survey #615) on March 11, 1744 the tract contained 166 
acres.  Henry Jaeger died in Heidelberg Township in 1748.  His 
will, dated April 8, 1748, was proved in 1748, but the exact date 
has not been preserved.  
 
 After Henry Yeager died the court appointed administrators 
of his estate did not perform and the land was sold to Henry Wirt 
at a public auction on February 1, 1754 (Liber A:71).
 
 At an Orphans Court held at Lancaster County Pennsylvania 
June 6, 1749, John Hochethorne [Heckendorn] was appointed 
guardian of John Yeager, son of Henry Yeager.  Hans [John] 
Heggendorn [Heckendorn] emigrated from Langenbruck, Basel-Land 
Switzerland in 1736 and arrived at Philadelphia on the ship 
PRINCESS AUGUSTA September 16, 1736 with Christian Sch\'e4ublin and 
a number of other immigrants from Basel-Land.  He settled in 
Heidelberg Township.  Shortly after his guardianship was settled, 
Johannes Jaeger was apprenticed to a blacksmith, but not Christian 
Sch\'e4ublin.  Johannes Jaeger remained a blacksmith throughout 
life.
 
 After the death of Henry Yeager, Anna Maria (Sch\'e4ublin) 
Yeager married (2) Henry Wirt, who arrived at Philadelphia on the 
ship JAMAICA GALLEY on February 7, 1738, and by whom she had a 
daughter, Catherine Wirt, among other children.   Proof of this 
marriage, and her previous marriage to Henry Yeager, is contained 
in the will of Henry Wirt in York County Prothonotary [Probate] 
records and he identifies her children by Henry Yeager in his 
will.  
 
 Catherine Wirt, daughter of Henry and Anna Maria (Sch\'e4ublin, 
Jaeger) Wirt, married Peter Ruble and settled in Washington County 
Tennessee.  Their son, Henry Ruble, married Barbara Hunter, 
daughter of John and Barbara (Bowman) Hunter.
 
 Johannes Jaeger, son of Henry and Ursula (W\'fcrtz) Jaeger, 
baptized at Arisdorf, Basel-Land Switzerland May 14, 1737, 
married Barbara Bowman, daughter of Jacob and Varena (____) 
Bowman.  This marriage probably occurred on Plum Run, a tributary 
of Conocheague Creek in present day Washington County Maryland 
about 1760.  Jacob Bowman settled on Plum Run in 1755.  Plum Run 
is about five miles WSW from Hagerstown, Maryland.
 
 Johannes and Barbara (Bowman) Jaeger remained on Plum Run on 
land he purchased (Frederick County Liber K:173) and additional 
land, part of her dower from her father, until 1773 when they 
sold their Maryland property (Frederick County Liber T:69) and 
moved to Augusta County Virginia, settling in that part of 
Augusta County that was in Rockingham County Virginia after 
creation of Rockingham County in 1778.  In Augusta (Rockingham) 
County they purchased land which had been patented to Valentine 
Sevier, father of John Sevier, first Governor of Tennessee.  This 
property was about 1/2 mile west of the community of Broadway, 
Virginia on the South side of the North Branch of the Shenandoah 
river.  The land had about three quarters of a mile of frontage 
on the river and included Cedar Creek, a very small tributary of 
the Shenandoah river and Vals Spring.  Val's Spring is still 
located on topographic maps.
 
 Johannes Jaeger and his father-in-law, Jacob Bowman, were 
naturalized as citizens of England at a court held in 
Philadelphia August 8, 1767.  They were then residents of 
Frederick County Maryland (Washington County was not created 
until 1776).  They did not take the oath of allegiance, but were 
affirmed, signifying they were of a pacifist religious 
persuasion, probably Church of the Brethren.
 
 In all records of Johannes Jaeger in Maryland he is called 
Johannes Jaeger or John Yeager.  However, when he moved to 
Rockingham County Virginia in 1773 he adopted the English 
translation of his Germanic name and became John Hunter.  In all 
records in Virginia, except the marriage record of his son John, 
and later in Tennessee records, he is called John Hunter.
 
 During the Revolutionary War John Hunter served as a private 
in the Virginia Militia in the Company commanded by Captain 
Abraham Lincoln.  This is Abraham Lincoln, grandfather of the 
president.  
 
 His service in the militia indicates that like many of his 
contemporaries of the pacifist religious persuasion, he decided 
there "Was a time to pray and a time to fight."  By serving in 
the military he was no longer welcome in the pacifist church, so 
he and Barbara became members of the Baptist church and were 
among the founding members of the Cherokee Creek Baptist Church 
in Washington County Tennessee.
 
 In 1783 he sold his property in Rockingham County Virginia 
and moved to Washington County Tennessee where he settled on 
Little Cherokee Creek.  By 1787, through purchases and grants, he 
owned 939 acres centered about the present (1994) Union Church on 
Little Cherokee Creek and extending for over mile along the creek 
and about equal distance on both sides of the creek, and held an 
additional 300 acres, in trust, for Peter Ruble.
 
 John and Barbara (Bowman) Hunter were the parents of 10 
children:
 
 
 1. John, born at Plum Run, Washington County 
Maryland November 27, 1762; married Elizabeth 
Osman.
 
 2. Maria Susannah, born at Plum Run, Washington 
County Maryland c1764; married David 
Robinson.
 
 3. Jacob, born at Plum Run, Washington County 
Maryland March 16, 1766; married Ann Clark.
 
 4. Henry, born at Plum Run, Washington County 
Maryland c1768; married Barbara Bollinger.
 
 5. Abraham, born at Plum Run, Washington County 
Maryland September 2, 1771; married Mary 
Marks.


6. Christiana, born at Linville Creek, 
Rockingham County Virginia May 20, 1874; 
married Robert Frier.


7. Catherine, born at Linville Creek, Rockingham 
County Virginia October 27, 1776; married 
John G. Bewley.
 
 8. Joseph, born at Linville Creek, Rockingham 
County Virginia February 22, 1779; married 
(1) Sarah Linville; married (2) Sarah 
Kimbrough.
 
 9. Barbara, born at Cherokee Creek, Washington 
County Tennessee May 28, 1784; married Henry 
Ruble.
 
 10. Isaac, born at Cherokee Creek, Washington 
County Tennessee c1786; married Elizabeth 
Kiger.
 
 
 
Sources:
 
Faust, Albert Bernhardt, A.B, Ph.D., and Gaius Marcus Brumbaugh, 
M.S., M.D.,  Lists of Swiss Immigrants in the Eighteenth Century 
to the American Colonies, Volumes I and II, 1925.
 
Strasburger, Ralph Beaver, LL.D., Pennsylvania German Pioneers, A 
Publication of the Original Lists of Arrivals In the Port of 
Philadelphia From 1727 to 1808, 1934.
 
Hively, Reverend Neal Otto, Index and Summary to Connected Draft 
Maps, Manheim and Heidelberg Townships, York County Pennsylvania, 
1989
 
Macco, Professor Hermann Friedrich, Swiss Emigrants to the 
Palitainate in Germany and to America 1650-1800, Vol. III, 1954.
 
Rupp, Israel Daniel, A Collection of Upward of Thirty Thousand 
Names of German, Swiss, Dutch, French, and Other Immigrants in 
Pennsylvania from 1726 to 1776, 1931.
 
Egle, William Henry, editor, Names of Foreigners Who Took the 
Oath of Allegiance to the Province and State of Pennsylvania, 
1727-1775, 1890.
 
Eyster, Anita L., compiler and translator. "Notices by German and 
Swiss Settlers Seeking Information of Members of Their Families, 
Kindred, or Friends Inserted between the Years 1742 and 1761 in 
the Pennsylvanische Berichte and between the Years 1762 and 1779 
in the Pennsylvanische Staatsbote." Pennsylvania German Folklore 
Society [Yearbook], vol.3, 1938.
 
Hinke, William J., and John Baer Stoudt, editors. A List of 
German Immigrants to the American Colonies from Zweibruecken in 
the Palatinate, 1728-1749, The Pennsylvania German Folklore 
Society Yearbook, Vol. 1 (1936),
 
Jones, Hank, "The Palatine Families of New York." The Palatine 
Immigrants 3:2 (Fall 1977).
 
Yoder, Don, editor. "Pennsylvania German Immigrants, 1709-1786: 
Lists Consolidated from Yearbooks of the Pennsylvania German 
Folklore Society, 1980.
 
Rae, Loraine, Washington County Tennessee Deeds, 1775-1800, 1991.
 
Church Records, Arisdorf and Wenslingen, Basel-Land Switzerland.
 
Land Records, Frederick County Maryland, Washington County 
Tennessee, and Augusta (Rockingham) County Virginia.
 
Probate Records, Lancaster County Pennsylvania.
 
Various manuscript material and Probate Records, York County 
Pennsylvania Historical Society.
 
Minutes of the Cherokee Creek Baptist Church, Washington County 
Tennessee.
 
Early East Tennessee Tax Payers, Creekmore, Pollyanna, 1980.
 
The Pennsylvania Genealogical Magazine, Vol. XXIV, 1965-1966.
 
Levinson, Constance A., and Louise C. Levinson, Rockingham County 
Virginia Minute Book, 1778-1786, 1985.
 
Kaylor, Peter Cline, and George Warren Chappelear, Abstract of 
Land Grant Surveys 1761-1791, Rockingham County Virginia, 1938.
 
Chalkley, Judge Lyman, Chronicles of the Scotch-Irish Settlement 
in Virginia, Extracted From the Original Court Records of Augusta 
County 1745-1800, 1912.
 
Wayland, John W., The Lincolns in Virginia, 1946.
 
McCown, Mary Hardin, Nancy E. Stickley and Inez E. Burns, 
Washington County Tennessee Records, 1778-1801, 1964.
 
U.S. Coast and Geodetic Survey Maps, Washington County Maryland, 
Rockingham County Virginia, and Washington County Tennessee.
 
 
 
Compiled by:
 
William J. Hunter
66 Glencairn Avenue
Ottawa, Ontario

Canada  K1S 1M6}

 

 
 
Generation One
 
 
1
 Johannes Jaeger, pronounced Yeager, the son of Heinrich and 
Ursula (W\'fcrtz) Jaeger, residents of the village of Olsberg, 
Basel-Land Switzerland, was baptized in the parish church at Arisdorf, 
Basel-Land Switzerland May 14, 1737.
 
 On March 5, 1740 his grandparents, Heinrich and Maria 
(Heinimann) Jaeger, together with his parents, Henry and Ursula 
(W\'fcrtz) Jaeger with their two children, Johannes and Heinrich 
Jaeger, were granted permission to immigrate from Switzerland 
(Staatsarchiv Basel, A II, folio 6).  They left shortly after, 
sailed down the Rhine river from Basel to Rotterdam, Holland 
where they boarded the ship FRIENDSHIP and arrived at 
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania September 23, 1740.  Because of the 
storms encountered on the voyage that year the passage took 
longer than planned and we know from letters written back to 
Switzerland by other families that about forty of the people who 
left Basel in 1740 perished enroute, principally from starvation.  
Among those who died was Ursula (W\'fcrtz) Jaeger, John's mother.
 
 Henry Jaeger Jr., John's father, married (2), about 1742, 
Anna Maria Sch\'e4ublin, daughter of Christian and Barbara 
(Spitteler) Sch\'e4ublin.  Anna Maria was baptized at Oberdorf, 
Basel-Land Switzerland October 6, 1723.  There were two children 
by this marriage, Anna Barbara, born about 1743 and Heinrich, 
baptized by Reverend Jacob Lischy, a Reformed Church minister, at 
Heidelberg Township, York County Pennsylvania March 18, 1745.  
Thus the Jaeger/Yeager family, prior to the death of Henry, was of 
the Reformed Church religious persuasion.
 
 Henry Yeager Jr. died in 1748.  His will was dated April 8, 
1748, was proved the same year, but the date has not been 
preserved.  At an Orphans Court proceeding in Lancaster County 
June 6, 1749, John Hochethorn [Heggendorn] was appointed guardian 
of John Yeager, and Henry Wirt, who later married Anna Maria 
(Sch\'e4ublin) Jaeger, was appointed guardian of Barbara and Henry 
Yeager, orphan children of Henry Yeager, deceased.
 
 Heinrich "Henry" Jaeger Jr., settled in that part of 
Lancaster County Pennsylvania that fell into York County when 
York County was created from part of Lancaster County in 1748.  
On February 16, 1742 he was issued a warrant for 100 acres of 
land in Heidelberg Township, Lancaster County by the proprietary 
of Pennsylvania, Richard Penn, son of William Penn.  When this 
tract of land was surveyed on March 11, 1744 it contained 166 
acres (Survey 615).  It was located about five miles east of the 
town of Hanover, Pennsylvania.
 
 After the death of his father, John was apprenticed to a 
blacksmith, probably Christian Sch\'e4ublin, father of Anna Maria 
(Sch\'e4ublin) Yeager.  Christian Sch\'e4ublin died before April 18, 
1752 and according to family tradition John remained an 
apprentice until about 1758.  John remained a blacksmith 
throughout his life and was successful because he left each of 
his children a sizeable estate.  
 
 Christian Sch\'e4ublin, who emigrated from Oberdorf, Basel-Land 
Switzerland in 1736, arriving on the same ship with John 
Heggendorn, who was later to become Johannes Jaeger's guardian, 
was a convert to a pacifist religious persuasion while still in 
Switzerland and this caused him considerable trouble and 
persecution before he left Switzerland.  If Johannes Jaeger lived 
in the household with Christian Sch\'e4ublin after his 
apprenticeship it may be there that he absorbed the pacifist 
religious beliefs that he later professed.  It is equally 
possible he was influenced in these beliefs by his step-mother or 
by John Heggendorn, his guardian.  John Heggendorn was identified 
as a member of the Church of the Brethren when he affirmed his 
signature as a witness to the will of George Phleeger in 1753 and 
to the will of Valentine Alt in 1755 in York County.
 
 John married Barbara Bowman, daughter of Jacob and Varena 
(____) Bowman about 1760.  The marriage was probably performed at 
or near the Bowman home on Plum Run, a branch of Conococheague 
Creek in present day Washington County Maryland.  Plum Run is 
about 5 miles WSW of Hagerstown, Maryland.
 
 John and Barbara settled on Plum Run until 1773 on land that 
was part of Barbara's dower and additional land he purchased from 
Elizabeth Smith on April 26, 1766 (Frederick County Liber K:173).  
On July 1, 1773 he sold his property on Plum Run to Jacob Tollor 
for \'a3200, current money of Pennsylvania (Frederick County Liber 
T:69).  He had moved to Augusta County Virginia prior to that 
time, settling in that part of Augusta County that was in 
Rockingham County Virginia after creation of Rockingham County 
from part of Augusta County in 1778.  
 
 On March 14, 1773, before he sold his Maryland property, he 
purchased 79 acres of land in Augusta County from John Jackson 
for \'a340, current money of Virginia (Augusta County Liber 20:176, 
177).  He is called "of Augusta County, Colony of Virginia" when 
he made this purchase on March 14, 1773 so he had left Maryland 
before that date.  
 
 On November 15, 1773 he purchased an additional 279 acres, 
contiguous to his original purchase in Augusta County from George 
Shoemaker for \'a3160 current money of Virginia (Augusta County 
Liber 19:497, 498).  This latter tract was land that had been 
patented to Valentine Sevier, father of John Sevier, first 
Governor of Tennessee.  This property was about 1/2 mile west of 
the community of Broadway, Virginia on the east side of the north 
branch of the Shenandoah river.  The land had about three 
quarters of a mile of frontage on the river and included Cedar 
Creek, a very small tributary of the Shenendoah river, and Vals 
Spring, probably named for Valentine Sevier, another small 
tributary of the Shenandoah river.
 
 Johannes Jaeger and his father-in-law, Jacob Bowman, were 
naturalized as citizens of England at a court held in 
Philadelphia August 8, 1767.  They were then residents of 
Frederick County Maryland, but living in what became Washington 
County in 1776 when that County was created from part of 
Frederick County.  They did not take the oath of allegiance when 
naturalized, but were affirmed, signifying they were of a 
pacifist religious persuasion, probably Church of the Brethren.
 
 Because he affirmed his allegiance to England rather than 
take the oath of allegiance we know he was a member of a pacifist 
religious persuasion when he was naturalized, however, unlike his 
Bowman in-laws who were staunch Brethren, his commitment to the 
Brethren faith was not deep enough to prevent him from taking up 
arms in the creation of his new country.
 
 During the Revolutionary War John Hunter served as a private 
in the Virginia Militia in the Company commanded by Captain 
Abraham Lincoln.  This is Abraham Lincoln, grandfather of the 
president.  
 
 His service in the militia indicates that like many of his 
contemporaries of the pacifist religious persuasion, he followed 
the example of Reverend Peter Muhlenberg, a famous Lutheran 
minister of the time in the Shenandoah valley of Virginia.  
Reverend Muhlenberg, who was pastor of the Lutheran Church at 
Woodstock, Virginia was commissioned Colonel, later General, of 
the 8th Virginia Regiment on January 12, 1776, and at the 
conclusion of his next religious service declared ".... that 
there is a time to pray and a time to fight, and that time has 
now come!"   After completing his sermon he removed his clerical 
robe and invited those who were interested to join him in the 
Continental Army.  Most of those of German ancestry in the 
Shenandoah valley, including the militia when they were called 
up, served under General Muhlenberg.  This probably included John 
Hunter and certainly included his son, John, as we learn from his 
pension records.
 
   By serving in the militia John was no longer welcome in the 
pacifist church, so he and Barbara became members of the Baptist 
church and were among the founding members of the Cherokee Creek 
Baptist Church in Washington County Tennessee when the Church 
Covenant of this church was signed "on the first Saturday in 
September 1783."
 
 In all records of Johannes Jaeger in Maryland he is called 
Johannes Jaeger or John Yeager.  However, when he moved to 
Rockingham County Virginia in 1773 he adopted the English 
translation of the Germanic name, Johannes Jaeger, and became John 
Hunter.  In all records in Virginia, except the marriage record 
of his son, John, in Rockingham County in May, 1781, he is called 
John Hunter, and is called John Hunter in all records in 
Tennessee.
 
 On July 28, 1783 the sale of his property in Rockingham 
County Virginia to Michael Hawber was confirmed in court 
(Rockingham County Minute Book 1778-1792, page 279) and on 
September 23, 1783 the court ordered payment to John Hunter for 
one horse lost in service in June, 1782 (Minute Book, page 297).  
Most Rockingham County records were destroyed during the Civil 
War. 
 
 About 1783 he moved to Washington County Tennessee where he 
settled on Little Cherokee Creek, about a mile from the John 
Sevier home.  It is probable he and his sons played a substantial 
part in the defense of the frontier, and in the many campaigns 
against the Indians that were led by John Sevier, but records 
have not been preserved.  
 
 By 1787, through purchases and grants, he owned 939 acres 
centered about the present (1994) Union Church on Little Cherokee 
Creek and extending for about a mile along the creek and about 
half that distance on both sides of the creek, and held an 
additional 300 acres, in trust, for Peter Ruble.
 
 On February 20, 1795 the Washington County Court ordered the 
survey and construction of a road from what is now Johnson City, 
Tennessee to Telford, Tennessee, and which is now the approximate 
route of Tennessee highway 67.  The order reads:  "Ordered that a 
wagon road be laid out from the wagon road that crosses Sinking 
Creek to the head of south Cherokee and down said creek to 
Roberts old mill and that Philip Ozames [Ausmus], John Hunter, 
Henry Hunter, Abraham Hunter, Frederick Andes, Charles Headrick, 
Peter Ruble, John Bewley, Anthony Bewley, Absolom Scott, Amos 
Ball and William Pugh be a jury to view and lay out the same."  
 
 The interesting part is the relationships of many of those 
involved.  Henry Hunter and Abraham Hunter are sons of John 
Hunter.  Philip Ozames is the father-in-law of Henry Hunter.  
John Bewley is the son of Anthony Bewley and is the son-in-law of 
John Hunter. Peter Ruble is John Hunter's brother-in-law, through 
marriage to his half-sister, Catherine Wirt.
 
 It becomes obvious that John Hunter, through his extended 
family, had a significant influence in that part of Washington 
county during the formative years of the county.
 
 John died at Cherokee Creek, Washington County Tennessee 
June 7, 1823 and Barbara died there November 22, 1831.  Her death 
is recorded in the Minutes of the church and the inventory of her 
estate was recorded January 3, 1832.  John's will, dated February 
25, 1809, with a codicil dated January 27, 1819, was proved at 
the July term of court in 1823 (Liber A:143).  In the will he 
mentions only children Barbara and Isaac, the other children, 
having each received the sum of \'a3100, are to receive a 
proportional part of his estate. 
 
 In the codicil to his will his faithful slave Bet [Betsy] is 
to be set free after the death of Barbara.  In accordance with 
the will, her emancipation on July 23, 1834 is recorded in the 
minutes of the Washington County court.  In the 1850 census 
Betsy, now called Betsy Hunter, was still living in Washington 
County with her grandson, Henderson Hunter, who was 17 years old.  
She was then 70 years old and was born in Maryland.
 
 John and Barbara are buried in the Cherokee Creek Baptist 
Church Cemetery in Washington County, but any gravestones have 
long since eroded.
 
 John and Barbara (Bowman) Hunter were the parents of 10 
children:
 
1. John, born at Plum Run, Washington County 
Maryland November 27, 1762; married Elizabeth 
Osman.


 2. Maria Susannah, born at Plum Run, Washington 
County Maryland c1764; married David 
Robinson.
 
 3. Jacob, born at Plum Run, Washington County 
Maryland March 16, 1766; married Ann Clark.
 
 4. Henry, born at Plum Run, Washington County 
Maryland c1768; married Barbara Bollinger.
 
 5. Abraham, born at Plum Run, Washington County 
Maryland September 2, 1771; married Mary 
Marks.
 
 6. Christiana, born at Plum Run, Washington 
County Maryland May 20, 1774; married Robert 
Frier.
 
 7. Catherine, born at Linville Creek, Rockingham 
County Virginia October 27, 1776; married 
John G. Bewley.
 
 8. Joseph, born at Linville Creek, Rockingham 
County Virginia February 22, 1779; married 
(1) Sarah Linville; married (2) Sarah 
Kimbrough.
 
 9. Barbara, born at Cherokee Creek, Washington 
County Tennessee May 28, 1784; married Henry 
Ruble.
 
 10. Isaac, born at Cherokee Creek, Washington 
County Tennessee c1786; married Elizabeth 
Kiger.
 
 
Sources:
 
Faust, Albert Bernhardt, A.B, Ph.D., and Gaius Marcus Brumbaugh, 
M.S., M.D.,  Lists of Swiss Immigrants in the Eighteenth Century 
to the American Colonies, Volumes I and II, 1925.
 
Strasburger, Ralph Beaver, LL.D., Pennsylvania German Pioneers, A 
Publication of the Original Lists of Arrivals In the Port of 
Philadelphia From 1727 to 1808, 1934.
 
Hively, Reverend Neal Otto, Index and Summary to Connected Draft 
Maps, Manheim and Heidelberg Townships, York County Pennsylvania, 
1989
 
Macco, Professor Hermann Friedrich, Swiss Emigrants to the 
Palitainate in Germany and to America 1650-1800, Vol. III, 1954.
Rupp, Israel Daniel, A Collection of Upward of Thirty Thousand 
Names of German, Swiss, Dutch, French, and Other Immigrants in 
Pennsylvania from 1726 to 1776, 1931.
 
Egle, William Henry, editor, Names of Foreigners Who Took the 
Oath of Allegiance to the Province and State of Pennsylvania, 
1727-1775, 1890.
 
Eyster, Anita L., compiler and translator. "Notices by German and 
Swiss Settlers Seeking Information of Members of Their Families, 
Kindred, or Friends Inserted between the Years 1742 and 1761 in 
the Pennsylvanische Berichte and between the Years 1762 and 1779 
in the Pennsylvanische Staatsbote." Pennsylvania German Folklore 
Society [Yearbook], vol.3, 1938.
 
Hinke, William J., and John Baer Stoudt, editors. A List of 
German Immigrants to the American Colonies from Zweibruecken in 
the Palatinate, 1728-1749, The Pennsylvania German Folklore 
Society Yearbook, Vol. 1 (1936),
 
Jones, Henry Z. "Hank," "The Palatine Families of New York." The 
Palatine Immigrants 3:2 (Fall 1977).
 
Yoder, Don, editor. "Pennsylvania German Immigrants, 1709-1786: 
Lists Consolidated from Yearbooks of the Pennsylvania German 
Folklore Society, 1980.
 
Rae, Loraine, Washington County Tennessee Deeds, 1775-1800, 1991.
 
Church Records, Arisdorf and Wenslingen, Basel-Land Switzerland.
 
Land Records, Frederick County Maryland, Washington County 
Tennessee, and Augusta (Rockingham) County Virginia.
 
Probate Records, Lancaster County Pennsylvania.
 
Various manuscript material and Probate Records, York County 
Pennsylvania Historical Society.
 
Minutes of the Cherokee Creek Baptist Church, Washington County 
Tennessee.
 
Creekmore, Pollyanna, Early East Tennessee Tax Payers, 1980.
 
The Pennsylvania Genealogical Magazine, Vol. XXIV, 1965-1966.
 
Levinson, Constance A., and Louise C. Levinson, Rockingham County 
Virginia Minute Book, 1778-1786, 1985.
 
Kaylor, Peter Cline, and George Warren Chappelear, Abstract of 
Land Grant Surveys 1761-1791, Rockingham County Virginia, 1938.
 
Chalkley, Judge Lyman, Chronicles of the Scotch-Irish Settlement 
in Virginia, Extracted From the Original Court Records of Augusta 
County 1745-1800, 1912.
 
Wayland, John W., The Lincolns in Virginia, 1946.
 
McCown, Mary Hardin, Nancy E. Stickley and Inez E. Burns, 
Washington County Tennessee Records, 1778-1801, 1964.
 
Bates, Lucy Womack, Roster of Soldiers and Patriots of the 
American Revolution Buried in Tennessee, 1974
 
Lucas, Rev. Silas Emmett, Jr., Obituaries from Early Tennessee 
Newspapers, 1794-1851.
 
U.S. Coast and Geodetic Survey Maps, Washington County Maryland, 
Rockingham County Virginia, Pickens County South Carolina, and 

Washington County Tennessee.}